Tag Archives: arri

What’s in that Grip Truck & When and Why do you Need one?

grip truck rental

Grip trucks are a well-stocked wonderland of just about every large tool and small gadgets you need to tackle a variety of on-set tasks and technical needs. They aren’t prohibitively expensive, even for budget-conscious shoots.  When you have your grip truck rental on set, the production magically seems to go faster, smoother and with less stress on the crew.

Working grips will tell you that the most important features are the truck layout and the quantity and quality of the carts. They highly value being able to quickly see what they need instead of having to dig for it.

Most professional rental houses offer 3, 5, and 10-ton versions of grip truck rentals as well as a 1-ton van package for smaller shoots. What’s inside? Here’s a walkthrough of a basic 5-ton grip truck package from Dave’s Grip & Lighting.

Stands

Priceless assets on any set, from preemies to low boys, there’s a stand for every job and you’ll need plenty. In a standard package you get 86 in total, including C-Stands, Beefy Babies, Combos and Low Boy Combos, Hi-Hi Rollers, Mombo Combos, Crank-O-Vators, and Mini Preemie stands. C-Stands, of course, are a filmmaking staple. Grips use them constantly.

Stand Accessories

Stands are true workhorses that you can use any number of applications. Gobo arms and knuckles provide options for hanging lights, draping drop cloths, positioning flags, or gripping and supporting just about anything on set. The 4.5” knuckles known as Lollipops set the standard for on-set safety. You can use them to secure overhead frames or larger flags.

Offset arms add that little extra bit of extension and removable turtle bases make getting low-to-the-ground shots super easy. A Platypus clamp is useful for securing bead board. Baby and Junior headers let you mount multiple light fixtures or accessories onto a single stand.

Apple boxes

Every set needs them and there are unlimited uses and advantages to having them. Full, half, quarter, and eighth (pancake) apple boxes are great for propping, standing, sitting, or leveling. Use them to build a table or nail wall plates to them to hold low-angle lighting fixtures.

Sandbags and furniture pads

There’s nothing high-tech about sandbags yet they’re an ever-essential tool. Aside from holding down light stands, you can use them for securing set walls. Convenient handles make it easy to hang them on hooks or risers.

Furniture pads, also known as sound blankets, can be used for everything from protecting equipment during transport to blocking light and wrapping large set pieces.

Clamps and clips

Clamps can be one of a grip’s best friends. They come in various sizes and shapes and you can use them in variety of ways. C-clamps are a classic hardware tool, but the ones used on set have spuds welded to the back for mounting them to C-stands. They also utilize u-shaped plates so you can attach the clamp to just about any surface. A Cardellini clamp has two angled jaws that you can tighten onto any round or flat surface. A Mafer clamp (super clamp) is designed to firmly bite down on pipes and poles. They are great for mounting lights in tight or awkward positions.

Grip clips are designed for one-handed operation and are perfect for holding reflectors, securing backdrops, and many other jobs where a strong clamp is required.

Lights and accessories

Arri Skypanels, Skypanels, Skypanels. This innovative light seems to be on every grip truck these days.  Consuming a modest amount of power and not creating much heat, it is punchy, soft and bicolor. This light does it all!

The ARRI Fresnel series, including the 300w, the 650w tweenie, the 1000w T1, and 2000w T2 are ideal anywhere compact and lightweight tungsten Fresnel spotlights are needed. They’re particularly handy in small studio settings where you might have a grid height problem. The ARRILITE 1000w and 2000w focus flood open face are designed to fill large areas. They are also great key lights for interview packages.

The ETC Source Four is a 750w fixture with a long throw. It’s generally found on stages, but it also works well in the field. You can manipulate it to cast a range of lighting effects.

An Ultrabounce 8×8, 12×12 or 20×20, provides a nice even bounce without any hot spots, while Grifflon features a tough, shiny dual surface with solid black on white side and bright white on the other. Flags and scrims include single net, double net, and poly silk, with a variety of frames supplied.

Production supplies, expendables, and everything else

Director’s chairs, different height step ladders, road cones, tarps, pop-up tents, plastic stacking chairs, first aid kit, fire extinguisher, and more. They’re all needed at some point on just about any production (except the fire extinguisher, we hope).

You also get common tools like a hammer, staple gun, shovel, rake, broom, and sledge hammer. As well as sawhorses and staples, nails, and screws in your grip truck rental. And no grip truck’s complete without some WD-40 and gaff tape.

In addition to a header cart, there are 2 C-stand carts, as well as cable & sandbag and flag & net carts. Black wrap, duvetyne, rubber mats, and clear Visqueen for weather protection of gear or as a floor covering are standard gear, as are foam core, bead board, and a selection of show cards.

All grip truck rentals come with or without a driver and we’re happy to help you crew your job with local, proven professionals. Contact us today to learn more or to reserve one of our grip truck rentals for your next South Florida shoot!

Lighting Techniques That Make Your Footage Look Cinematic

Dave’s Grip & Lighting on the job lighting a corporate interview

If you’re into filmmaking, or looking for a gaffer in Miami, like us to help you out, you’d probably agree that lighting skills are an essential tool in every filmmaker’s tool box. One size does not fit all in the lighting world and the last thing you want is for your cinematic scene to look like broadcast news. And, you probably also want to know how to do it yourself! 

DIY baby!

While everyone uses lighting in filmmaking, many don’t know how to use the available tool effectively. Our goal is to shed some light on the basics of interview lighting and lighting actors. Whether you’re a film school student or an indie filmmaker, here are some basic lighting techniques that we’ve been using for years that’ll help your footage look more cinematic:

Three-point lighting

Before you can play with light in filmmaking, you need to understand basic three-point lighting. It’s standard to illuminate a scene from three separate positions, with three different lights – key light, fill light and backlight. Each light serves a different purpose in your overall lighting scheme. Let’s take a close look at each of them.

Key light – The primary light source in a scene and often the strongest one is called the Key light. This light helps to effectively expose the main subjects in a scene. Typically, you set the key light on one side of the subject roughly around 45 degrees above them, so that their other side gets a contrasting shadow.  This could be an Arri Sky Panel. Kinoflo 4 foot 4 bank. Arri 650 Fresnel with a Chimera.  Litemate 4. Astra 1×1 Bicolor LED.  Kinoflo Diva. 

Fill light – As the term suggests, the fill light helps fill the shadows on your subject created by the key light. That’s precisely why a gaffer in Miami like me would always recommend placing the fill light on the opposite side of the key light. Fill light is usually softer than the key light, but you can vary its softness depending on the mood and feel of your scene. To that end, you may can use a reflector as your fill light source. Astra 1×1 Bicolor LED soft. Litemate 4 dimmed.  Arri 300 Fresnel with a Chimera.  Kinoflo Diva.

Back light – The purpose of back light is to separate the subject from the background. This light usually shines above and behind a subject. Gaffers in Miami often direct the light on an actor’s shoulder to create an light contour that creates separation and gives the an edge to the subjects body.  This could be a Joker 200.  Arri 650 Fresnel.

Four-point lighting

This technique adds a fourth light, commonly known as a background light, to the typical three-point lighting setup. That way, you can add more depth to your scene. When I work as a gaffer in Miami I will often position the fourth light behind my subject  low and on the floor on a pigeon plate screwed to a pancake apple box and direct it to the background. You can also use the background light to kill the shadows cast by your foreground objects or subjects. Often you are lighting a backdrop or wall behind the subject.

Butterfly or Paramount lighting

A lighting concept borrowed from studio portrait photography, butterfly lighting is a way of illuminating an actor’s face with the key light thrown directly at them from the front and above. As a result, the key light creates a hard shadow under the actor’s nose or chin. Often, the shadow would look like a butterfly, hence the name butterfly lighting. You’ll see a massive use of this lighting technique in old Hollywood movies by Paramount Pictures, which is why it is also called Paramount lighting.

If you want to soften the harsh butterfly-like shadows, you can use a reflector to bounce back some fill light from front and below onto the subject’s face. This will also help kill any shadows under the subject’s eyes and make the eyes appear to glow.

Rembrandt lighting (one of my favs)

Pioneered by the famous Dutch painter Rembrandt, this lighting technique uses a single light source, AKA the Key light. The light illuminates one side of the subject’s face, while also creating a triangle of light on the other side. This type of lighting looks natural and helps add definition to the subject’s face.

If you’re not sure how to execute this lighting setup in your film set, consider hiring an experienced gaffer in Miami. Usually, you should place the key light on the side of the face that is farthest from camera, with its height raised at around a 45-degree angle. Now you simply need to fine-tune the light’s positioning until it forms a triangle of light on the shadow part of the face. If you want, you can use a reflector as your fill light.

Loop lighting

Here’s one similarity between loop lighting and butterfly lighting. Both of them create a shadow under the subject’s nose. But the shadow from loop lighting typically extends toward on the subject’s cheek, as opposed to appearing right under the nose.

Loop lighting got its name from the fact that the shadow created by it looks like a loop. You can create either a small or a long loop depending on your scene and creative preferences. This lighting setup requires positioning the Key light on one side of the subject’s face at around 30-45 degrees above eye level. You can also use fill light to soften the harsh shadows created by the primary source light.

Split lighting

If you want to add a sense of drama to your scene or want to make your character look menacing, consider using split lighting. This lighting technique, as the term suggests, splits the subject’s face into two equal halves. To achieve split lighting, a gaffer in Miami would often place the key light 90 degrees offset from the actor, so that only one half of the face gets lit. You can also use flags and barn doors to make sure the other half of the actor’s face is in complete shadow.

With these basic film lighting techniques, you can now start experimenting with them in your filmmaking. These methods can be blended.  Practice using a combination of these techniques on your productions to make your film look cinematic and not like news!